Modern Alternative Popes 15: The Cardinal Siri Thesis

Modern Alternative Popes 15: The Cardinal Siri Thesis

On 26 October 1958, white smoke coming out from the famous Vatican chimney for five minutes indicated that a new pope had been elected after the demise of Pius XII. Somewhat later, however, this was reported a mistake; the conclave went on. The advocates of the so-called Siri Thesis mean that Guiseppe Cardinal Siri, the archbishop of Genoa, was legally elected at the conclave, and not the Patriarch of Venice, Angelo Roncalli (John XXIII).

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Modern Alternative Popes 14: William Kamm

Modern Alternative Popes 14: William Kamm

William Kamm (the future Peter II) was born in 1950 in Cologne, Germany, but as a little child, he moved to Australia together with the rest of the family. Aged eighteen, he said that he had begun receiving heavenly messages and gathered a small group of followers, who believed that he was a voice-box of God. In 1970 he founded the Marian Work of Atonement, his first religious organisation. During these years, he was a bank employee for some time.

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Modern Alternative Popes 13: L’Eglise de Banamè

Modern Alternative Popes 13: L’Eglise de Banamè

Mathias Vigan (Christopher XVIII, 2012-) was a Roman Catholic priest, ordained in 2000 in the Diocese of Abomey, Benin. He served as a parish priest in Banamé, when he, in 2008, met Vicentia Tadagbé Tchranvoukinni. She was born in 1992 and according to later followers she had no parents but was found left alone. She was brought to Mathias Vigan, who should perform an exorcism on her, as she was regarded as possessed and he was obviously impressed by her spiritual powers.

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Modern Alternative Popes 11: The Real Hidden Church

Modern Alternative Popes 11: The Real Hidden Church

Maurice Archieri (Peter II, 1995-2016), born 1923 was a former car mechanical, who lived in Le Perreux-sur-Marne, France. After an “intellectual vision” at Pentecost 1995, he claimed to be Vicar of Christ (in spiritualibus) in the end times. He took the name Peter II but did not claim to be the pope. The reason given by Archieri was that there could be no pope in the current era, as the Roman Church had “eclipsed” and no orthodox Roman hierarchy was left. According to Archieri the true church in the end time is L’Église Réelle Occultée, the Real Hidden Church, and not the Roman Catholic Church.

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Modern Alternative Popes 10: The Missionary Order for the Salvation of Souls

Valeriano Vestini (Valerian I, 1990-1995) was born Olinto Vestini, taking the name Valeriano when he joined the Capuchin order. He later became superior of the Mater Domini monastery in Chieti. In 1983, a local woman called Rita claimed to have dreams which featured Vestini as a representative of Padre Pio. The dreams included a divine command: that the group around her should work for the salvation of souls, joining forces with the seers of Lourdes, Fatima and Medjugorje. Rita left the group in 1989, and the role as the voice-box of heaven was taken over by Nicola Di Carlo and Alessandro Di Donato.

 

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Modern Alternative Popes 9: Two Uncertain Cases

Aimé Baudet (Peter II or Peter Athanasius II, 1984?) is a Belgian man, who lived in Brussels. According to some reports, this man enthroned pope before St. Peter’s grave in 1984. Allegedly, he was a Palmarian ex-bishop. Still, this seems to be something of an urban legend.

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Modern Alternative Popes 8: Hadrian VII?

Modern Alternative Popes 8: Hadrian VII?

Francis Konrad Maria Schuckardt (Hadrian VII 1978?/1984?-) was born in Seattle in 1937. He graduated from a Jesuit University in 1959 and briefly entered the priest seminary in Carthage, Missouri, which he had to leave due to illness. Thereafter, he worked as a high school teacher and was very active in the Blue Army of Our Lady of Fatima, eventually becoming a member of its International Council. In the mid-1960s, however, Schuckardt was dismissed from the Blue Army for publically condemning Vatican II, and he became one of the first active sedevacantists in the United States.

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