Modern Alternative Popes 11: The Real Hidden Church

Modern Alternative Popes 11: The Real Hidden Church

Maurice Archieri (Peter II, 1995-2016), born 1923 was a former car mechanical, who lived in Le Perreux-sur-Marne, France. After an “intellectual vision” at Pentecost 1995, he claimed to be Vicar of Christ (in spiritualibus) in the end times. He took the name Peter II but did not claim to be the pope. The reason given by Archieri was that there could be no pope in the current era, as the Roman Church had “eclipsed” and no orthodox Roman hierarchy was left. According to Archieri the true church in the end time is L’Église Réelle Occultée, the Real Hidden Church, and not the Roman Catholic Church.

Continue reading “Modern Alternative Popes 11: The Real Hidden Church”

Modern Alternative Popes 10: The Missionary Order for the Salvation of Souls

Valeriano Vestini (Valerian I, 1990-1995) was born Olinto Vestini, taking the name Valeriano when he joined the Capuchin order. He later became superior of the Mater Domini monastery in Chieti. In 1983, a local woman called Rita claimed to have dreams which featured Vestini as a representative of Padre Pio. The dreams included a divine command: that the group around her should work for the salvation of souls, joining forces with the seers of Lourdes, Fatima and Medjugorje. Rita left the group in 1989, and the role as the voice-box of heaven was taken over by Nicola Di Carlo and Alessandro Di Donato.

 

Continue reading “Modern Alternative Popes 10: The Missionary Order for the Salvation of Souls”

Modern Alternative Popes 9: Two Uncertain Cases

Aimé Baudet (Peter II or Peter Athanasius II, 1984?) is a Belgian man, who lived in Brussels. According to some reports, this man enthroned pope before St. Peter’s grave in 1984. Allegedly, he was a Palmarian ex-bishop. Still, this seems to be something of an urban legend.

Continue reading “Modern Alternative Popes 9: Two Uncertain Cases”

Modern Alternative Popes 8: Hadrian VII?

Modern Alternative Popes 8: Hadrian VII?

Francis Konrad Maria Schuckardt (Hadrian VII 1978?/1984?-) was born in Seattle in 1937. He graduated from a Jesuit University in 1959 and briefly entered the priest seminary in Carthage, Missouri, which he had to leave due to illness. Thereafter, he worked as a high school teacher and was very active in the Blue Army of Our Lady of Fatima, eventually becoming a member of its International Council. In the mid-1960s, however, Schuckardt was dismissed from the Blue Army for publically condemning Vatican II, and he became one of the first active sedevacantists in the United States.

Continue reading “Modern Alternative Popes 8: Hadrian VII?”

Modern Alternative Popes 6: The New Universal Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Modern Alternative Popes 6: The New Universal Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Gino Frediani (Immanuel I, 1974-1984) was born in 1913 and served as a parish priest in Gavinana in Italian Pistoia from the 1940s onwards. Beginning in 1973, he claimed to receive apparitions from Old Testament prophets. On 5 September 1973, he asserted that the prophet Habakkuk had placed a hand on his head saying that the Italian parish priest was chosen to fulfil a great universal mission: “to build a Holy Church to the Sacred Heart of Jesus”.

Continue reading “Modern Alternative Popes 6: The New Universal Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus”

Modern Alternative Popes 3: Apostles of Infinite Love, Canada

Modern Alternative Popes 3: Apostles of Infinite Love, Canada

Gaston Tremblay (Gregory XVII, 1968-2011) was born in Rimouski, Quebec 1928 into a rather poor family. His father died when he was young, and his mother became a nun. At age sixteen, Tremblay moved to Montreal to join the Brothers of St. John, the Hospitalers. There he was renamed Brother Jean and worked with terminally ill patients. Around 1947, he began to receive apparitions, and in 1949, he claimed to have seen the face of a future pope in a vision.

Continue reading “Modern Alternative Popes 3: Apostles of Infinite Love, Canada”

Det mexikanska Nya Jerusalem

Det mexikanska Nya Jerusalem

Genom åren har jag sysslat en hel del med katolsk traditionalism, speciellt i den spanskspråkiga världen. 2015 skrev jag en kort artikel om en traditionalistisk kommunitet, en “helig stad”, som ligger i provinsen Michoacán i Mexiko och benämns Nueva Jerusalén, Nya Jerusalem. Den har sin grund i en serie uppenbarelser av jungfru Maria och en rad andra helgon från 1973 och framåt. Kommuniteten har många gånger varit skådeplatsen för, ibland våldsamma, sammandrabbningar mellan olika schatteringar och grupper av personer som ledarna uppfattar som heterodoxa har drivits ut. Trots detta har inte polismyndigheten eller andra delar av det mexikanska samhället ingripit.

Läs artikeln här

Bibliography on the Palmarian Church

Here is a select bibliography of published works on the Palmarian Catholic Church.

Alonso, Javier & Rafael Canales. 1976. El Palmar de Troya: Festival del integrismo. Madrid: Sedmay Ediciones.

Barrios, Manuel & María Teresa Garrido Conde. 1976. El apasionante misterio del Palmar de Troya. Barcelona: Planeta.

Beltrán y Bachero, José Carlos. 1989. “Unerlaubte bzw. ungültige Priester und Bischofsweihen in El Palmar de Troya.” Pp. 419-433 in Ius et historia: Festgabe für Rudolf Weigand zu seinem 60 Geburtstag. Würzburg: Echter.

Cadoret-Abeles, Anne. 1981. “Les apparitions du Palmar de Troya: Analyse antropologique d’un phénomène religieux.” Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez 17, 369-378.

Cebolla López, Fermín. 1976. El vidente ciego: Cisma sin teólogos en El Palmar de Troya. Bilbao: Editorial CLA.

Garrido Vázquez, Moisés. 2004. “El Palmar de Troya: 35 años de cisma.” Chapter 6 in El negocio de la Virgen, Madrid: Ediciones Nowtilus.

Garrido Vázquez, Moisés. 2008. “El Palmar de Troya: Cuatro décadas de integrismo mariano”, Misterios y fenómenos insólitos 84, 4-12. Accessed from on 12 August 2015

Gómez Burón, Joaquín & Antonio Martín Alonso 1976. El enigma de El Palmar de Troya, Barcelona: Editorial Personas.

Hall, Maria. 2015. Reparation: A Spiritual Journey, Haven Publishing, 2015.

Continue reading “Bibliography on the Palmarian Church”

The Palmarian Church

The Palmarian Church

Apart from my main research area (colonial Latin America) for many years I have done research on the Palmarian Catholic Church, a Spanish dissenter group or, if one prefers, a new religious movement. The church has a basis in purported apparitions of Christ, the Virgin Mary and many other saints at Andalusian Palmar de Troya from the late 1960s onwards. Through the 1970, the group around the leaders Clemente Domínguez and Manuel Alonso. A new religious order was founded, clerics were ordained and consecrated and in 1978, at the death of Pope Paul VI, Clemente Domínguez claimed that he was divinely elected pope. The church of Rome had apostatisized and the Holy See was moved to Palmar de Troya. I have published two articles on the church, its organization and beliefs. One is a briefer profile, while the other is a 60-page article. They can be consulted here: Articles about the Palmarian Church

Here is another article about the Palmarians, published in Nova Religio in 2013.